Cold and flu sea­son has arrived with some vengeance. It is shap­ing up to be an intense cou­ple of months.

Hol­i­day travel and shop­ping crowds con­nected the dots on both coasts.

Hard to know which is which? Usu­ally, colds are milder and include a runny or stuffy nose. A cough and sneez­ing go along with a cold.

The flu is usu­ally more severe and typ­i­cally comes on sud­denly. The flu has a knack for wip­ing peo­ple out for a few days. Fever, body aches, and exhaus­tion com­monly accom­pany the flu.

Pre­ven­tion is key. Hav­ing a flu shot will min­i­mize the affects of this year’s virus. Proper and fre­quent hand wash­ing will stave off con­t­a­m­i­nat­ing germs left on door knobs, phones, uten­sils and other surfaces.

Boost immu­nity by get­ting enough antioxidant-​rich fruits and veg­gies in the diet. They help fight dam­ag­ing par­ti­cles known as free rad­i­cals. Eat­ing cooked shi­take mush­rooms increases T-​Cells and low­ers inflam­ma­tion.

Broc­coli, cab­bages and kale offer big boosts to the sys­tem. Mak­ing hot soup is a com­fort and nutri­tional pow­er­house when select­ing veg­eta­bles, herbs and gar­lic and gin­ger to com­bat ill­ness.

Win­ter cit­rus is peak­ing and makes for a deli­ciously juicy snack for cur­ing what ails us. Vit­a­min C cuts down on the length of time a cold will last.

Stay hydrated. Flu­ids help thin out the mucus that the body pro­duces when an indi­vid­ual is sick. When that germ-​filled mucus is thin­ner, it’s eas­ier to clear.

Good choices are water, orange juice, sports drinks, or hot liq­uids that can ease a sore throat. Try herbal teas or hot broths.

Those that work in food­ser­vice and food retail have dou­ble expo­sure with risk from cus­tomers and cowork­ers. If food han­dling is involved, take care not to spread ill­ness through prepar­ing meals, serv­ing plates or mer­chan­dis­ing fresh pro­duce.

No one wants to get or be sick. Stay home if you get sick. Don’t be a mar­tyr. Take time off. Work­ing instead of rest­ing could pro­long recov­ery time or worsen the symp­toms.

Con­sider cowork­ers and col­leagues. Avoid spread­ing germs and infec­tion to those around the work­place. Dead­lines are impor­tant, but so too is a healthy work envi­ron­ment.

Stud­ies sug­gest that viruses have an eas­ier time sur­viv­ing in dry air, so humid­i­fiers may help reduce a viruses abil­ity to sur­vive.

Dry indoor air makes a sore throat and a wicked cough even worse. A humid­i­fier can help these symp­toms become more bear­able.
Get well soon…eat, drink and rest.

To read the full Mar­ket Report, includ­ing this week’s mar­ket update, see below or click here.

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