Fresh News



Cab­bages are from the “cole crop” fam­ily. Other mem­bers in this hearty tribe include broc­coli, Brus­sels sprouts, kohlrabi, col­lard greens and cau­li­flower.

We can sep­a­rate cab­bages in to four main types: green, red (or pur­ple), Savoy, and Napa cab­bages.

In com­mon are the sexy lay­ers of alter­nat­ing leaves, each cup­ping the next, form­ing a firm, dense head. Spring is the per­fect excuse to explore using all four types of cab­bages in a myr­iad of ways.

Braised, boiled, charred, sauteed or raw; rolled, slawed or casseroled– cab­bage is happy at cen­ter plate or assum­ing a sup­port­ing cast role.

From Ger­many to Asia, schnitzel to stir fry, world cuisines know how make cab­bages some­thing we crave. Com­fort dishes made by grand­moth­ers give mod­ern recipes a run for the money.

Selec­tion: Choose firm, heavy heads of green, red and savoy cab­bage with closely furled leaves. Color is an indi­ca­tion of fresh­ness. For exam­ple, green cab­bages stored for too long lose pig­ment and look almost white. To ensure fresh­ness, check the stem ends of cab­bage heads to make sure the stem has not cracked around the base, which indi­cates unde­sir­ably lengthy stor­age. Chi­nese cab­bage leaves should be crisp, unblem­ished and pale green with tinges of yel­low and white.

Read more: All in the Family →

Mid-​March we’ll get our Irish on and cel­e­brate Saint Patrick’s Day. Wear­ing the color green is a tra­di­tional way to sup­port the hol­i­day.

March also boasts the start of Spring and Palm Sun­day. Two more days that draw atten­tion to shades of green.

On the sub­ject of emer­ald, celadon, jade and olive, use this month as a nudge toward fill­ing the plate with more things green.

Green veg­eta­bles and fruits are known for being good sources of phy­tonu­tri­ents, fiber and water that can revi­tal­ize health.

To main­tain healthy cho­les­terol lev­els, increase the con­sump­tion of green foods like avo­ca­dos, olives, green peas and grapes. They con­tain monoun­sat­u­rated fatty acids and fiber that aid in low­er­ing cho­les­terol.

Spinach, cucum­ber and green apple can aid in con­trol­ling blood pres­sure. Look­ing for a boost to the immune sys­tem? Check out all things green in the pro­duce section.

Read more: Make It Green →

All indus­tries have jobs that require train­ing. Food, and pro­duce specif­i­cally, are no dif­fer­ent. What sets us apart is the care and han­dling required of fresh food prod­ucts.

Indi­vid­u­als who are new to the pro­duce learn­ing curve are promptly informed that they are not han­dling a can of veg­eta­bles on a gro­cery store shelf.

What­ever the role played along the sup­ply chain, human hands are involved. Plant­ing, har­vest­ing, pack­ing, ship­ping, and prepa­ra­tion call for a deep under­stand­ing of tak­ing the best care, at all times, of the fruits and veg­eta­bles.

Fac­tors like proper stor­age tem­per­a­ture and cold chain are fun­da­men­tal not only for prod­uct longevity, but also for how it may end up tast­ing on the plate.

There is a sub­stan­tial dif­fer­ence for retail clerks between “throw­ing freight” and care­ful han­dling. Proper receiv­ing, put-​away and hand-​stacking can pre­vent dam­age (crack­ing, bruis­ing and smash­ing) to fresh goods.

Some items are hardier than oth­ers. Pota­toes, onions and car­rots quickly come to mind. Still, giv­ing them a soft touch rather than a rough tum­ble will pre­serve their integrity.

Bell pep­pers may appear to be sturdy. Slam­ming their car­tons down on a rack or shelf will crack their ten­der walls and loosen their mem­branes. Treat them as frag­ile cargo, along with most other unsus­pect­ing fresh ingre­di­ents.

Pota­toes, toma­toes, avo­ca­dos, pears, whole mel­ons, and other fruits and veg­eta­bles are often stored at room tem­per­a­ture to main­tain qual­ity. Some items in this group like the room tem­per­a­tures for quicker ripen­ing purposes.

Read more: “Take Care“ →

Depend­ing on geog­ra­phy, there might be snow on the ground where you live. Mother Nature rules the weather.

This month is usu­ally chilly, wet and some­times foggy in most of the grow­ing dis­tricts, yet there are blos­soms, buds and bulbs start­ing to sprout. The promise of Spring is here.

Win­ter fatigue is real. Meal prepa­ra­tion and recipe rota­tion have made us weary. Still, we eat hap­pily through the sea­son.

What we eat depends largely on what is in sea­son now and read­ily avail­able. Whether its from a local farm­ers mar­ket, gro­cer or food box deliv­ery, the fresh pro­duce ingre­di­ents are col­or­ful and ver­sa­tile.

Cit­rus fruits, win­ter squashes, cab­bages, fen­nel, cook­ing greens and root veg­eta­bles should be on this month’s shop­ping list. What to do with them is a wide open sub­ject.

Mix up the meal plan with win­ter soups, stews and casseroles. Slow cook­ers and Instant pots keep things on track for make now, eat later plan­ning. Onions, cel­ery, car­rots and gar­lic begin the con­ver­sa­tion.

Mush­rooms of all vari­eties – cri­m­ini, shi­take and oys­ter add to the cho­rus line. Build depth of fla­vor and inter­est using spices and herbs. One fresh herb com­po­nent is cer­tain to take things in a very spe­cific direc­tion. Rose­mary stands out. One sin­gu­lar choice, leeks for exam­ple, yield a par­tic­u­lar mouth feel and taste. Part of the allium fam­ily, they are kin to onions, gar­lic, shal­lots, and chives.

Read more: In Sea­son Now →

Sumo Cit­rus are also known as “deko­pon,” which is a Japan­ese ref­er­ence to the dis­tinc­tive top knot of the fruit.

This triple hybrid cit­rus fruit is a cross-​breed of navel oranges, pomelo and man­darin oranges.

They were first devel­oped in Japan in 1972 with tra­di­tional plant-​breeding tech­niques. When Cal­i­for­nia farm­ers began to grow the seed­less fruit, they trade­marked the name “Sumo Cit­rus”.

The name is an obvi­ous play on the phys­i­cal char­ac­ter­is­tics of the well-​known sumo wrestlers in Japan. The fruit is large in size, round in shape and instantly rec­og­nized by their top knot accent, which is the sig­na­ture hair­style of the wrestlers.

Seedlings were first imported into the United States in 1998, but because the Sumo Cit­rus is one of the most chal­leng­ing vari­eties to grow, and requires at least four years to pro­duce, it wasn’t until 2011 that they became avail­able to the pub­lic.

The fruit’s extremely del­i­cate skin is eas­ily bruised and sun­burned. Cal­i­for­nia farm­ers are ded­i­cated to the pam­pered and painstak­ing atten­tion required of Sumo Cit­rus.

Trees are hand-​pruned to allow for more sun­light to reach the fruit as it grows. Left to ripen on the tree, they are then hand-​picked when ready. They are har­vested in small totes instead of big bins as other cit­rus fruits. Floated into the pack­ing line to pre­vent bruis­ing, they are then hand-​packed into car­tons.

The seed­less cit­rus is super easy to peel and eat. The zip peel makes them con­ve­nient for lit­tle hands or any­one really who finds it tedious to peel a reg­u­lar orange.

Sumo Cit­rus are low in acid­ity, mak­ing them a good choice for those who can’t tol­er­ate a higher level of fruit acid.

Read more: Sumo Power →

Play­off games and the Super Bowl are one giant invi­ta­tion for Amer­i­cans to snack. New year’s res­o­lu­tions to “eat bet­ter” go out the win­dow once game time grabs our atten­tion.

The req­ui­site chips, crack­ers, dips, salty nuts, meat and cheese plat­ters make graz­ing part of the tele­vi­sion watch­ing foot­ball ritual.

Pots of chili, grilled sausages, and foot long sand­wiches have tra­di­tion­ally fed large crowds for game-​watching. This year, smaller house­hold gath­er­ings will pre­vail for com­mon sense activity.

Fewer mouths to feed doesn’t elim­i­nate those highly crave-​able game day foods. A bag of Ruf­fles potato chips and French onion dip come to mind. Clas­sic, yes, but cer­tainly not on the 2021 snack res­o­lu­tion list.

The thing about mind­ful eat­ing is plan­ning and prepa­ra­tion that goes in to it. A full day or after­noon of munch­ing is best served by a decent pre­lim­i­nary strat­egy. Set a good inten­tion to include guilt-​free munchies. They won’t kill the health­ier eat­ing goals already estab­lished. Real foods equal good eat­ing.

Read more: Board Games →

Tinga is a pop­u­lar stew using a blend of Mex­i­can and Span­ish cook­ing meth­ods. The result is a per­fect mar­riage of spicy, sweet and smoky fla­vors.

Chicken or pork are favored meats used in this tra­di­tional Pueblo dish. Lentils, chick­peas or pota­toes are solid veg­e­tar­ian twists.

Onions and gar­lic are sauteed first. Like most authen­tic Mex­i­can recipes, white onions are pre­ferred. Toma­toes are then added. Fresh toma­toes are used when avail­able and taste great. Vari­ety isn’t really impor­tant.

Oth­er­wise, canned toma­toes are quite suit­able. Good choices dur­ing win­ter months would be to use fire roasted toma­toes, crushed toma­toes or even tomato sauce or tomato paste in a can.

Next comes adding the stock, herbs and spices. Bay leaves, salt, pep­per and Mex­i­can oregano are stan­dard spices used in a tinga. Corian­der, thyme and mar­jo­ram take another culi­nary path.

Chipo­tle chilies in Adobo sauce give the stew a sub­stan­tial kick. Essen­tially, chipo­tles in adobo are smoked and dried jalapeños chiles– rehy­drated and then canned in toma­toes, vine­gar, gar­lic, and spices.

Decide on the heat pref­er­ence before adding a whole can of pep­pery heat. There’s no turn­ing back once they go into the stew pot or slow cooker.

House made chipo­tle chilies are doable, but require more effort. If han­dling chili pep­pers is no prob­lem, look for jalapeños that are firm. The fresher the pep­pers, the bet­ter the result.

The mix­ture is sim­mered long enough to allow all of the ingre­di­ents to meld nicely together. If meat is desir­able, add that to the sim­mer­ing sauce. If not, add legumes or other vegetables.

Read more: Tinga This →

Cham­pi­oning a return to nor­malcy as the new year begins includes meals that are restora­tive in nature.

Cold weather invites soups, bisques and broths to com­bat winter’s chill.

The heal­ing pow­ers of soup are undis­puted. Veg­etable and herb-​centric broths set up a base­line on which to build.

While soups may not cure the cold or flu, they will relieve their symp­toms. Good for hydra­tion, warm­ing prop­er­ties of broths and soups also can clear con­ges­tion and flush out tox­ins from the res­pi­ra­tory sys­tem.

Sup­port­ing the immune sys­tem is some­thing that good nutri­tion in any form does well. Pack­aged in a steamy hot bowl of soup is a home­made remedy.

Read more: Restorative →

Cold, damp months perk up from win­ter cit­rus. The skin, zest, juice and tangy flesh brighten up culi­nary choices with great fla­vor and a lively vibrancy.

Cit­rus fruits add color, tang, sweet­ness, and tart­ness. They eas­ily bring some needed bal­ance to savory, rich, or sweet dishes.

In addi­tion to numer­ous culi­nary ben­e­fits, cit­rus fruits also pro­vide a wide range of healthy, “good for you” attrib­utes. They are proven to be good med­i­cine dur­ing win­ter and beyond.

Dieti­tians and health pro­fes­sion­als heap high praise on cit­ruses for their high vit­a­min C con­tent. One medium orange pro­vides more than 100 per­cent of the rec­om­mended daily vit­a­min C needs.

Cold and flu sea­son is rea­son enough to boost our immu­nity. Fight­ing the risk of COVID-​19 is why the dou­ble down efforts focus on the cit­rus defen­sive. Lucky then that we are headed into the peak of cit­rus sea­son.

Cit­ruses help our bod­ies get rid of free rad­i­cals and pos­i­tively impact a range of meta­bolic func­tions that help us thrive.

What’s so amaz­ing is their ver­sa­til­ity. Beyond being a per­fect out-​of-​hand snack, cit­rus fruits can be enjoyed in a myr­iad of ways.

Read more: Good Medicine →

Cae­sar Salad is an ionic culi­nary favorite. There are plenty of riffs on this clas­sic fresh salad.

Adding toma­toes, avo­ca­dos, hard-​boiled eggs and even grilled chicken or shrimp takes it to another whole-​meal prepa­ra­tion.

Do you recall when you took your first bite of this reli­able and ele­gant salad? Per­haps it fixes a place in time rather than an age. Bet­ter yet, the per­son who may have made it for us. Think back.

The few sim­ple, high qual­ity ingre­di­ents are com­bined into an exquis­itely per­fect salad. Romaine let­tuce, fresh gar­lic, fresh lemon juice, olive oil, parme­san cheese and rus­tic crou­tons seem too easy. They are a match made in heaven and prove to be sophis­ti­cated for any palette.

Anchovy fil­lets are left up to debate. In or out, the salad stands on its own mer­its. No need to quib­ble. They can be served on the side for any­one who doesn’t like these tiny, briny fish. Sales were up eighty-​five per­cent on anchovies year over year.

What’s life chang­ing is get­ting an impor­tant intro­duc­tion to any num­ber of ingre­di­ents, foods or prepa­ra­tions that stay with us for a life­time. Those new food expe­ri­ences serve us through­out our cook­ing reper­toire. We build on what we find to be the most tasty and enjoy­able foundation.

Read more: Appetite for New →

Click to Down­load the Lat­est Recall PDF
On Fri­day, Octo­ber 11, 2019, our res­i­dent GP “Chefs” made 14 deli­cious dishes using any vari­ety of win­ter squash. Some devel­oped their own recipes while oth­ers cooked or adapted clas­sic recipes found in cook­books or inno­v­a­tive recipes found on food blogs. Win­ners won Tar­get gift cards of $25, $15 or $10.

Con­grat­u­la­tions to the win­ners & thank you to all of the par­tic­i­pants. We enjoyed a very tasty Fri­day and have a new appre­ci­a­tion for win­ter squash thanks to you!
Check out the dishes and click on the titles in green to see the recipes:

Cran­berry Chip Squash Bread
Romana Har­ris
First Place

Kuri Curry
Coconut Soup
Gina Back­ovich
Sec­ond Place

But­ter­nut Squash
Galette
San­dra Sanchez
Third Place

But­ter­nut Squash, Sausage
and Tortellini Soup
Traci Ennis

But­ter­nut & Red Kuri
Squash Soup
Rochelle Grover

Parme­san Acorn
Squash
Leah Haz­zard

Roasted Red Kuri Squash with Can­nelli Beans
& Spinach Salad

Linda Luka

Kabocha Squash
Donut Muffins
Linda Luka


Spicy Squash Salad
with Lentils and
Goat Cheese

Jeff Sac­chini

African Lamb Kabocha Tagine
Gina Back­ovich

Lemon Grass But­ter­nut Squash
Patty Chan

Sauteed Del­i­cata
Squash
Nancy Spinella

Green business Bureau article about GP
Green Busi­ness Bureau
By Amanda John­son Sep­tem­ber 11, 2018 Blog, Mem­ber News

From food­ser­vice to retail, export to whole­sale, the fresh pro­duce dis­tri­b­u­tion busi­ness can cover a wide-​rage of busi­ness seg­ments that come together to ser­vice every­thing from gro­cery stores to restau­rants and casi­nos to schools. One busi­ness that suc­cess­fully cov­ers all of these seg­ments is Green Busi­ness Bureau mem­ber, Gen­eral Pro­duce Com­pany, a com­pany tack­ling the fresh pro­duce mar­ket in North­ern Cal­i­for­nia.

Founded in 1933 by Chan Tai Oy, his three sons and nephew, Gen­eral Pro­duce Co. is a third gen­er­a­tion owned and oper­ated fam­ily busi­ness that dis­trib­utes and exports fresh fruits and veg­eta­bles that are local, organic, sus­tain­able, and region­ally and glob­ally sourced. As a PRO*ACT mem­ber, Gen­eral Pro­duce is focused on energy con­ser­va­tion and reduc­tion, recy­cling and par­tic­i­pat­ing in pro­grams like Greener Fields Together, a local farm ini­tia­tive. Gen­eral Pro­duce works to inte­grate sus­tain­abil­ity – social, envi­ron­men­tal and eco­nomic – into their daily busi­ness prac­tices and long range plan­ning.

While Gen­eral Pro­duce is chal­lenged with facil­i­ties that are dated in terms of struc­tures, energy sys­tems, fleet demand for ser­vice and CA leg­is­la­tion, they have worked hard to be cre­ative in address­ing the demands of state man­dates, as well as facil­ity lay­out. From light­ing to cool­ing and refrig­er­a­tion, the company’s oper­a­tions and facil­ity team con­tin­u­ously work toward mak­ing improve­ments. They also look for ways to min­i­mize the company’s envi­ron­men­tal impacts in the areas of water, waste, energy and air, and reduce their car­bon foot­print by installing cost sav­ing mea­sures.

“Our approach to busi­ness is guided by our com­mit­ment to the prin­ci­ples of integrity, hon­esty, per­sonal rela­tion­ships, diverse exper­tise, stew­ard­ship and inno­va­tion,” said Linda Luka, Direc­tor of Mar­ket­ing & Com­mu­ni­ca­tions. “We are ded­i­cated to pro­vid­ing qual­ity ser­vice and prod­ucts. To do so, our aim is to ensure that our work­force and com­mu­ni­ties ben­e­fit from the small scale of our daily oper­a­tions to the large scale of our sup­ply chain.”

Read the orig­i­nal arti­cle here.

Seek­ing to infuse your culi­nary or bev­er­age cre­ations with the ulti­mate fresh fruit fla­vor? No need to peel, dice, purée, and sim­mer for those ideal results.
Per­fect Purée is the solution!

Per­fect Purée is the pre­mium purée prod­uct on the mar­ket. The suc­cu­lent, single-​note fla­vors of Per­fect Purée inspire every­thing you can think of: cock­tails, mari­nades, cakes, cook­ies, sor­bets and smooth­ies. At the back of the house or front of the house, chefs, cookes, baris­tas, bar­tenders, pas­try chefs, and brew mas­ters love this prod­uct line!

For a per­fect sum­mer, try out our favorite warm weather fla­vors: El Cora­zon, Pink Guava & Pas­sion Fruit.

Call us today to order your sam­ple kit. Can’t wait? Go online to http://​bit​.ly/​g​p​p​u​r​e​e.

Dan Chan (Pres­i­dent) and Tom Chan (CEO) with Sacra­mento Food Bank & Fam­ily Service’s Kelly Siefkin (far left) and Blake Young (sec­ond from right)
Last week, Farm-​to-​Fork and Food Tank hosted the inau­gural food sum­mit called Farm Tank in Sacra­mento. Look­ing to fur­ther offer indus­try mem­bers oppor­tu­ni­ties to learn about the unique per­spec­tive of Cal­i­for­nia food and agri­cul­ture, Gen­eral Pro­duce par­tic­i­pated in Farm Tank in many ways. We really wanted to pro­vide an exhil­a­rat­ing expe­ri­ence that will advance con­ver­sa­tion around access to healthy food. All of the thought­ful con­ver­sa­tion and edu­ca­tion that tran­spired those few days could poten­tially improve our local food system.

Read more: Farm Tank Sum­mit & On the Plate 2016


Learn about California’s rich agri­cul­tural industry.


CON­GRAT­U­LA­TIONS RYAN BLANCAS!

The United Fresh Retail Pro­duce Man­ager Awards Pro­gram pays spe­cial recog­ni­tion to pro­duce man­agers on the front lines in super­mar­kets work­ing every day to increase sales and con­sump­tion of fresh fruits and veg­eta­bles. Gen­eral Pro­duce is hon­ored to have nom­i­nated yet another win­ner, Ryan Blan­cas of Beale AFB Commissary.

In June, Ryan, along with Gen­eral Pro­duce team mem­bers, will attend the United Fresh Pro­duce Inno­va­tion Con­fer­ence in Chicago. United Fresh will honor 25 of the industry’s top retail pro­duce man­agers for their com­mit­ment to fresh pro­duce, inno­v­a­tive mer­chan­dis­ing, com­mu­nity ser­vice and cus­tomer satisfaction.

Left to right:
Mar­lon Walker, Store Direc­tor, Beale AFB Com­mis­sary
Alan Edi­ger, VP Busi­ness Devel­op­ment, Dole Fresh Veg­eta­bles
Ryan Blan­cas, Pro­duce Man­ager, Beale AFB Com­mis­sary, 2016 Retail Pro­duce Man­ager Award Win­ner
Jeff Ober­man, VP Trade Rela­tions, United Fresh Pro­duce Association
Just a lit­tle less than 2 hours away in Pleasan­ton, the Expo It is a great oppor­tu­nity for us to see what’s new out there. It is easy for us to take our cus­tomers with us to con­nect with grow­ers, ship­pers, and retail­ers. The Expo exhibitors pro­vide updates on their lat­est crops and prod­ucts while we get to talk to them about how and why they do what they do.

GP Team Mem­bers David John III, Jen­nifer Ho, Ray Hoell­warth, and Linda Unden attended the FPFC Nor­Cal Expo this year. They all enjoyed it and are look­ing for­ward to more FPFC events.

Read more about the event:

By Kath­leen Weaver

Most con­sumers believe pro­duce comes shrouded in plas­tic; per­fectly selected apples pre­sented in a pris­tine pack­age ready to enjoy. And while any­one eat­ing fruits and veg­eta­bles excites me for all the obvi­ous rea­sons; health and com­merce related, there is one sig­nif­i­cant dif­fer­ence between the eater of today and that of the past. Eighty years ago most folks knew how an apple was grown, which is no longer the case.

Eighty years ago a sub­stan­tial chunk of the work­force was employed in agri­cul­ture; 22% of work­ers rep­re­sent­ing roughly 27 of 123 mil­lion peo­ple who called the US home at the time. They farmed on small farms in all regions of the US pro­duc­ing mostly for their own sub­sis­tence. How­ever, trends began to shift with elec­tri­fi­ca­tion, mech­a­niza­tion, and infra­struc­ture and trans­port improve­ments, allow­ing peo­ple to seek off-​farm work. This is where we see the most sub­stan­tial change in our food sys­tem that until recently remained unchallenged.

Read more: Break­ing Down Bar­ri­ers for Local Food →

Dan, Brian and Tom (in absen­tia) received the Seven Seals Award rec­og­niz­ing Gen­eral Pro­duce as a Patri­otic Employer for its sup­port of the Guard and Reserve. At a spe­cial pre­sen­ta­tion in front of the Sacra­mento Board of Super­vi­sors , Gen­eral Pro­duce, along with other Sacra­mento area employ­ers, were hon­ored and recognized.

For the past 12 years, GP has been able to accom­mo­date our National Guards­man, Todd Pratt, as he has been called for train­ing and deployed dur­ing his mil­i­tary ser­vice. We are proud of him and proud to be able to con­tribute to sup­port­ing our mil­i­tary troops abroad.

Read more here:

http://​www​.esgr​.mil/​N​e​w​s​-​E​v​e​n​t​s​/​E​S​G​R​-​I​n​-​T​h​e​-​N​e​w​s​/​a​r​t​i​c​l​e​T​y​p​e​/​A​r​t​i​c​l​e​V​i​e​w​/​a​r​t​i​c​l​e​I​d​/​5194​/​G​e​n​e​r​a​l​-​P​r​o​d​u​c​e​-​C​o​m​p​a​n​y​-​s​u​p​e​r​v​i​s​o​r​-​h​o​n​o​r​e​d​-​b​y​-​D​e​p​a​r​t​m​e​n​t​-​o​f​-​D​e​f​e​n​s​e​-​f​o​r​-​p​a​t​r​i​o​t​i​c​-​s​u​p​p​o​r​t​.​a​s​p​x

Gen­eral Produce’s vision of cre­at­ing a dis­tinc­tive, col­lab­o­ra­tive cel­e­bra­tion to high­light the best Cal­i­for­nia grown foods in the midst of the 2015 Sacra­mento Farm-​to-​Fork Fes­ti­val came to fruition and exceeded all expectations.

Gen­eral Pro­duce, a third-​generation, locally owned, family-​run dis­tri­b­u­tion com­pany part­nered with long­time cus­tomer, Fat’s Fam­ily Restau­rant Group, to host “On the Plate” dur­ing this year’s Farm-​to-​Fork Fes­ti­val on Sep­tem­ber 26th.

The large mar­quee booth (a 50′ x 60′ tent and out­side dis­play space) attracted folks with a vin­tage Gen­eral Pro­duce deliv­ery truck, draped in fresh flo­ral, fruits and veg­eta­bles. The col­or­ful fall hard­scape pro­vided the per­fect back­drop for snap­shots. This dis­play was the most phot­graphed of the day for press and fes­ti­val atten­dees, post­ing to Insta­gram, Twit­ter and Facebook.

Read more: “On the Plate” Draws Impres­sive Crowd at 2015 Farm-​to-​Fork Festival →

Gen­eral Pro­duce is proud to be a spon­sor of the Farm-​to-​Fork Fes­ti­val.

Here are some scenes from the day!


Gen­eral Pro­duce con­tributed to a new Guin­ness World Record for the largest fruit & veg­etable dona­tion with 170,923.8 pounds of fresh pro­duce col­lected for the Sacra­mento Food Bank and Fam­ily Ser­vices.

This Farm-​to-​Fork Cel­e­bra­tion event was orga­nized by the Sacra­mento Con­ven­tion and Vis­i­tors Bureau with an orig­i­nal goal of 25,000 pounds of pro­duce. Gen­eral Pro­duce was pleased to donate 2,000 pounds to the cause and deliver an addi­tional 300 pounds of Pre­mier Mushrooms!

Per­ish­able News

The Packer

And­NowU­Know

Sacra­mento Bee
Sacramento’s third Farm-​to-​Fork cel­e­bra­tion will open in less dra­matic fash­ion than the pre­vi­ous two.

The event, which cul­mi­nates Sept. 27 with the (sold-​out) Tower Bridge Din­ner, will kick off at 5 a.m. Wednes­day with a fresh-​food drive on Capi­tol Mall. Con­tri­bu­tions will go to Sacra­mento Food Bank & Fam­ily Ser­vices, which will dis­trib­ute food and serve as a clear­ing­house for other food banks in the region.

Local gro­cers Raley’s and Nugget, pro­duce sup­plier Gen­eral Pro­duce, Cal­i­for­nia Endive Farms and the Cal­i­for­nia Pear Advi­sory Board will donate pro­duce to the event. Dona­tions of fresh, local pro­duce from the pub­lic also are welcome.

The goal is to col­lect at least 25,000 pounds of fresh food and set a Guin­ness World Record. A Guin­ness rep­re­sen­ta­tive will be on hand at the food drive, which lasts until 11 a.m.

World record bid aside, this kick­off event likely will pro­vide less spec­ta­cle than the inau­gural Farm-​to-​Fork celebration’s cat­tle drive and the sec­ond year’s trac­tor parade – both of which tra­versed the Tower Bridge. But it’s still an out­size dis­play of Sacramento’s farm-​to-​fork bona fides, said Mike Testa of the Sacra­mento Con­ven­tion & Vis­i­tors Bureau.

“The first year, we wanted to show that farm-​to-​fork was not just pro­duce, but pro­teins,” Testa said. “The sec­ond year was to show the equip­ment that was nec­es­sary for farm to fork. This year, it is to show the bounty of every­thing that is com­ing out of the ground, and to ben­e­fit peo­ple in need – with fresh food and not the tra­di­tional canned goods that peo­ple think of when they think of food donations.”
There are few other places in the coun­try “that could com­pete for a (fresh-​food) world record in a 24-​hour period,” Testa said. “And if they did, they likely would be sourc­ing (some of it) from the Sacra­mento region.”

Sacra­mento Mayor Kevin John­son declared Sacra­mento “America’s farm-​to-​fork cap­i­tal” in 2012. The city’s first Farm-​to-​Fork cel­e­bra­tion, in Sep­tem­ber 2013, lasted a week. This year’s cel­e­bra­tion runs 2 12 weeks and includes the free Farm-​to-​Fork Fes­ti­val Sept. 26 on Capi­tol Mall.

Sacra­mento Bee

America’s Farm to Fork Cap­i­tal, Sacra­mento, CA

Gen­eral Pro­duce, a lead­ing family-​owned and oper­ated pro­duce dis­trib­u­tor, is very proud to announce achieve­ment on their goal of “green cer­ti­fi­ca­tion” through a third-​party eval­u­a­tion and process.

“Thanks to sus­tain­able efforts already in place and prac­tice at Gen­eral Pro­duce, the cer­ti­fi­ca­tion process was achieved well ahead of our orig­i­nal year-​end goal,” said Linda Luka, direc­tor of mar­ket­ing and com­mu­ni­ca­tions for Gen­eral Pro­duce. “Green Plus helped us eval­u­ate and iden­tify areas that we could enhance and expand, as well as focus on new oppor­tu­ni­ties in the sus­tain­abil­ity arena. No one argues that as an indus­try, there is much work to be done. We are pleased to be at the front of that parade.”

Read more: Gen­eral Pro­duce Achieves Green Certification →

Gen­eral Pro­duce is proud to be a spon­sor of the Farm-​to-​Fork Festival.


For more infor­ma­tion, go to http://www.farmto​fork​.com


Inspired by the abun­dance of region­ally avail­able fresh prod­ucts, as well as the hard-​working fam­ily oper­a­tions who pro­vide us with high qual­ity foods, Gen­eral Pro­duce announces a col­lab­o­ra­tive effort to cel­e­brate a locally-​grown food expe­ri­ence dur­ing the 2015 Sacra­mento Farm-​to-​Fork Festival.

Gen­eral Pro­duce, a third-​generation, locally-​owned, family-​run dis­tri­b­u­tion com­pany has part­nered with Fat’s Fam­ily Restau­rant Group, who cel­e­brated their 75th anniver­sary last year, to host “On the Plate” dur­ing this year’s Farm-​to-​Fork Fes­ti­val on Sep­tem­ber 26. This mar­ques event will show­case local ingre­di­ents pre­pared in sig­na­ture recipes by chefs from each of Fat’s four loca­tions. The key component(s) in each cook­ing demon­stra­tion will be sup­plied from local pur­vey­ors who share the vision of pro­vid­ing high qual­ity prod­ucts from California’s heart­land, including:

Van Gronin­gen & Sons
Ratto Broth­ers
Vierra Farms
Pre­mier Mushrooms
Lund­burg Fam­ily Farms
Salle Orchards
Mary’s Chick­ens

“As con­sumers crave a bet­ter under­stand­ing of where their orig­i­nates and of how it is pro­duced, we are priv­i­leged to share the sto­ries of the fam­i­lies who grow or raise the rice, the poul­try, the wal­nuts, the fresh greens, etc.”, said Linda Luka, direc­tor of mar­ket­ing and com­mu­ni­ca­tions for Gen­eral Pro­duce. “Food is per­sonal. We have an oblig­a­tion to pre­serve our rela­tion­ships with the grow­ers and rec­og­nize the dis­tinc­tive places of where our food is raised. The focus is on fresh and sea­sonal. Our sto­ries are about authen­tic and local. It makes sense to part­ner with long-​time, like-​minded fam­ily oper­a­tions to set the table at this year’s Farm-​to-​Fork Festival.”

In addi­tion to the live cook­ing demon­stra­tions, atten­dees will have the oppor­tu­nity to taste spe­cially pre­pared dishes, receive cook­ing tips and recipes, win prizes and most impor­tantly meet the farm­ers who sup­ply the Cal­i­for­nia ingredients.

“The Sacra­mento Farm-​to-​Fork Fes­ti­val is a cel­e­bra­tion of com­mu­nity and a chance to appre­ci­ate the locally grown, pro­duced and sourced foods of our great region. That’s some­thing we have a pas­sion for,” said Tom Chan, CEO of Gen­eral Pro­duce. “We’re proud to expand our par­tic­i­pa­tion this year to show­case these excep­tional ven­dor part­ners and encour­age every­one to stop by to expe­ri­ence ‘On the Plate with Fat’s Fam­ily Restau­rant Group’.”


About Gen­eral Pro­duce - Gen­eral Pro­duce annu­ally dis­trib­utes over 250 mil­lion pounds of fresh pro­duce prod­ucts to retail­ers, restau­rants, schools and other whole­salers in North­ern Cal­i­for­nia, West­ern Nevada, South­ern Ore­gon and the Pacific Rim. Head­quar­tered in Sacra­mento, the “Farm-​to-​Fork Cap­i­tal of the World,” Gen­eral Pro­duce is a proud sup­porter of the locally grown move­ment and sources from a net­work of local farms to sup­ply the best pro­duce avail­able. This third-​generation family-​owned busi­ness has hon­ored their com­mit­ment to world-​class cus­tomer ser­vice for more than 80 years. To learn more about Gen­eral Pro­duce, please visit www​.Gen​er​al​Pro​duce​.com.


Per­ish­able News
And­NowU­Know
Fresh Plaza
The Packer

If you love local, sustainably-​farmed food, Cal­i­for­nia pear farm­ers have what you’re look­ing for. This week, a group of Cal­i­for­nia pear farm­ers has launched a cam­paign to pro­mote pears pro­duced in and around Sacra­mento as part of the America’s Farm-​to-​Fork Cap­i­tal movement.

Nearly all pears from Cal­i­for­nia are grown in small com­mu­ni­ties near Sacra­mento. Each year in early July pears begin har­vest­ing from the Sacra­mento Delta grow­ing area and then in neigh­bor­ing Lake and Men­do­cino coun­ties later in the month. That means that locally-​grown pears are plen­ti­ful in sum­mer and through­out the fall.

“We’re hop­ing to get con­sumers excited about locally-​grown pears and the farm­ers who grow them,” said Chris Zanobini, exec­u­tive direc­tor of the Cal­i­for­nia Pear Advi­sory Board, which is head­quar­tered in Sacra­mento. “Pear farm­ers are big sup­port­ers of the America’s Farm-​to-​Fork Cap­i­tal pro­gram and we’re help­ing to spread the word about foods grown near Sacra­mento with a num­ber of spe­cial events, give­aways and pro­mo­tions for Sacra­mento area consumers.”

Read more: Pear Farm­ers Launch Locally Grown Cam­paign for Sacramento-​Area Consumers →

Gen­eral Pro­duce has announced its con­tin­ued advo­cacy for healthy lifestyles for California’s youth by host­ing a series of events this sum­mer. In com­bi­na­tion with sev­eral gro­cers and DeCA com­mis­sary stores, the Gen­eral Pro­duce team is tak­ing its “Let’s Move Cal­i­for­nia” show on the road.

“We value our work­ing rela­tion­ships with California’s finest inde­pen­dent gro­cers, as well as our DeCA part­ners,” said Linda Luka, Mar­ket­ing Direc­tor of Gen­eral Pro­duce. “Our mis­sion to edu­cate our youngest con­sumers is top of mind as we cul­ti­vate the next gen­er­a­tion of healthy eaters.”

These events tie-​in with Gen­eral Produce’s par­tic­i­pa­tion with the eat brighter!™ cam­paign and encour­ages pro­duce con­sump­tion in chil­dren. Includ­ing fresh gar­den bars, fresh fruit pizza mak­ing, face paint­ing, water games, and Zumba ses­sions, Gen­eral Pro­duce will pro­vide local kids with an oppor­tu­nity to win a bike, a fam­ily movie pack­age, or other sum­mer fun prizes. Out­door pro­duce farm­ers mar­kets coin­cide with most of the events, mak­ing it a fam­ily affair.

“These events help high­light the gro­cery retailer as a true com­mu­nity part­ner. Events are fun for all involved and exem­plify how healthy eat­ing and an active lifestyle help cre­ate a fit for life gen­er­a­tion,” con­tin­ued Luka.

Gen­eral Produce’s 2015 Sum­mer Kid’s Events include:

June 11th: Lone Tree School Sum­mer Camp (Zumba-​tonics & Salad Bar) on Beale Air Force Base.
July 11th: Pay­less IGA Cop­per­opo­lis (Home­town Kid’s Event)
July 18th: Pay­less IGA Pio­neer (Home­town Kid’s Event)
August 8th: Pay­less IGA Lock­e­ford (Home­town Kid’s Event)

Thanks to Gen­eral Pro­duce for bring­ing these fun events to Sacramento!

And­NowU­Know