Fresh News



There has been a resur­gence of Cal­i­for­nia gar­lic, both in con­sumer demand and also in pro­duc­tion. The 2018 Cal­i­for­nia gar­lic crop will heighten that trend.

Christo­pher Ranch, California’s largest gar­lic sup­plier, reports fan­tas­tic pro­duc­tion lev­els this year, the likes of which have not been seen in years. Great news for gar­lic lovers.

Ken Christo­pher, Exec­u­tive Vice Pres­i­dent for the com­pany, announced their fore­cast this sea­son to be about 100 mil­lion pounds of gar­lic.

“Demand for organic gar­lic has been explo­sive and it is the fastest-​growing busi­ness seg­ment”, Ken Christo­pher said.

The com­pany har­vested 5 mil­lion pounds of organic gar­lic last year and expect to har­vest 10 mil­lion pounds of organic gar­lic in 2018. By far, this is the biggest organic crop ever for Christo­pher Ranch. This will be the first year they are expected to have a 100 per­cent Cal­i­for­nia organic pro­gram.

The two most preva­lent vari­eties grown com­mer­cially in Cal­i­for­nia are Cal­i­for­nia Early and Cal­i­for­nia Late. Early gar­lic har­vest begins in June and con­tin­ues for a cou­ple of weeks. Early gar­lic inven­to­ries will last for about five months.

Early gar­lic will typ­i­cally size up a lit­tle larger, but also tends to have more stain­ing because it is har­vested closer to the time fields see rain.

Late gar­lic har­vests begin in July and rep­re­sents about 80 per­cent of total gar­lic vol­ume.

This crop is more uni­form in siz­ing than the early gar­lic and typ­i­cally has a more creamy fin­ish. The two vari­eties look fairly sim­i­lar.

Fresh gar­lic is packed in field bins of 2,000 pounds. When gar­lic is packed, it is run across indus­trial heaters that warm the gar­lic to make bulbs eas­ier to clean.

As the largest gar­lic pro­duc­ing state, Cal­i­for­nia pro­duces over 90 per­cent of com­mer­cial gar­lic grown in the United States. The impor­tance to our nation as a food source is crit­i­cal when con­sid­er­ing the com­pet­i­tive prac­tices used by other coun­tries.

Issues of tar­iffs may soon come into play as farm­ers com­pete with the prac­tice of dump­ing or flood­ing the mar­ket with cheaper gar­lic or inflat­ing prices.

Not all gar­lic is cre­ated equal. Cal­i­forn­ian is bold on fla­vor. Heir­loom seed stock and sus­tain­able fam­ily farm­ing tra­di­tions make domes­tic gar­lic highly prized.
Whole, chopped, crushed or minced – look for sat­is­fac­tion in this season’s bumper gar­lic crop.

To read the full Mar­ket Report, includ­ing this week’s mar­ket update, see below or click here.

Market Report page 1

Market Report page 2

Market Report page 3

Market Report page 4

Music venues and out­door con­certs get a lot of traf­fic all sum­mer long. Indi­vid­ual tastes run the spec­trum from rock, blues and coun­try to reg­gae, pop and rap.

Clas­si­cal sum­mer choices fea­ture Mozart and Bach. If sym­phonies and operas don’t res­onate, try a dif­fer­ent type of sum­mer jam.

Peak of sea­son fruits beg for pre­serv­ing in some fash­ion. We can’t eat it all no mat­ter how hard we try. Jams, jel­lies, com­potes and mar­malades allow the essence of sum­mer to be cel­e­brated in a jar.

Sin­gle small batched jams can be achieved in a short period of time, mak­ing the process rel­a­tively pain­less. In just an hour of invest­ment, fruit can be trans­formed in to a mag­nif­i­cent jarred treat.

Like most other food endeav­ors, we get out of it what we put in to it. Qual­ity going in means qual­ity in the jar. Pick or pur­chase high-​quality fruit at its peak for fla­vor, tex­ture, and color. Skip mushy, over­ripe, and dis­eased fruit.

Read more: Sum­mer Jams →

Nes­tled between Mount Dia­blo and the Sacramento-​San Joaquin Delta in the East Bay, Brent­wood, Cal­i­for­nia is renowned for grow­ing excep­tional fresh mar­ket pro­duce.

In par­tic­u­lar, sum­mer cher­ries, peaches and delec­table sweet corn are what local mar­kets and chefs cel­e­brate.

Hot Cen­tral Val­ley days and cool, off-​shore breezes at night make it the per­fect loca­tion for grow­ing sweet corn.

The cobs are picked dur­ing the early milk stage of ker­nel matu­rity, when sugar con­tent and mois­ture lev­els are high. This is in con­trast to field corn, which is har­vested in the dry, starchy dent stage. Over the last cen­tury, sweet corn pro­duc­tion in the U.S. has increased as farm­ers and geneti­cists have devel­oped hardier and sweeter vari­eties.

To clar­ify, most of the corn grown in the United States is the com­mod­ity crop known as field corn. It is used as ani­mal feed, ethanol, whiskey and goes into all kinds of processed foods and food ingre­di­ents. High-​fructose corn syrup, corn starch, and corn oil.

Read more: Brent­wood Diamonds →

What’s a sip of mojito or slice of key lime pie with­out the bright­ness of fresh lime juice? Lack­ing for starters.

Lucky then that limes are avail­able year round to impart their aro­matic, tangy good­ness.

Under­stand­ing the vari­etal dif­fer­ences in limes might be use­ful for the best choices in culi­nary appli­ca­tions.

Although there are other cit­rus species that are referred to as “limes”, the Per­sian lime is the most widely cul­ti­vated lime species com­mer­cially grown. It accounts for the largest share of the fruits sold as limes.

Extremely fla­vor­ful, Per­sian limes are a key ingre­di­ent in regional cuisines world­wide. Also known as Tahit­ian or Bearss, Per­sian limes deliver an intensely tart fla­vor to your dishes and cock­tails. Typ­i­cally sold while still dark green, they become light green to a mild yel­low as they ripen.

Read more: Sub­lime Times →

Cal­i­for­nia pear farm­ing areas are arguably in some of the most desir­able and beau­ti­ful places in the state.

The beauty of his­toric pear orchards con­tributes sig­nif­i­cantly to the appeal of com­mu­ni­ties such as Court­land and Clarks­burg, located in the Sacra­mento River Delta grow­ing region.

Lake­port and Kelseyville rep­re­sent the Lake County pear grow­ing dis­trict. Ukiah, in the Men­do­cino grow­ing dis­trict, rounds out the real estate.

Together these grow­ing areas pro­duce approx­i­mately 150,000 tons of pears each year. The vol­ume of pears pro­duced in Cal­i­for­nia has declined in recent years, as has the num­ber of pear farm­ers.

Even so, the Cal­i­for­nia pear indus­try remains a lead­ing sup­plier of pears to the world.

Read more: Cal­i­for­nia Pears →

Any kind of sum­mer sur­plus should be met with com­plete culi­nary abandonment.

Fresh herbs in par­tic­u­lar have a way of ele­vat­ing most cre­ations. Don’t let their sheer abun­dance go to waste.

Trans­form those “tried and true” old dishes into some­thing extra­or­di­nary. Herbs have an unfor­get­table bright­ness that cat­a­pults ho-​hum up to OMG!

Clas­sic sal­ads are reju­ve­nated with an addi­tion of chopped green herbs. Cilantro, mint and Ital­ian pars­ley perk up any green, pasta or potato salad. Com­bine a cou­ple to deliver a new take on favored Cae­sar, Cobb and Chopped versions.

Herbed but­ters and herb-​infused oils are largely irre­sistible with grilled meats and veg­eta­bles. Finely minced tar­ragon, pars­ley, oregano or basil beg for a chance with soft­ened but­ter and gar­lic for breads, pasta, seafood and fish.

Read more: “Dilly, Dilly“ →

Steamy sum­mer days make it tough to stay cool. Stay­ing hydrated is another mat­ter altogether.

Drink­ing enough water or other flu­ids is a tall order for some. It can require a delib­er­ate action plan. This is par­tic­u­larly true when it comes to seniors, chil­dren and athletes.

Ade­quate hydra­tion can pre­vent cramps, heat exhaus­tion, dizzi­ness, low blood pres­sure and heat stroke.

The aver­age per­son can lose as many as ten cups of fluid from daily activ­i­ties and exer­cise. This may be stag­ger­ing on extremely hot days with severe con­se­quences. Fre­quent hydra­tion is essential.

There are plenty of tricks to boost smart hydra­tion. Visual cues are help­ful reminders to stay replen­ished through­out the day. Set up a hydra­tion sta­tion in plain sight.

Read more: Hydra­tion Station →

Whether your busi­ness is a top notch retail store or a casual café, upscale restau­rant or busy hotel, chances are, “we’re hir­ing” signs are posted.

Hir­ing now and no expe­ri­ence nec­es­sary are vis­i­ble every­where. Labor con­tin­ues to be the Achillis’ heel for all seg­ments of the food indus­try.

Cus­tomers recently viewed a dis­claimer at a local fast-​casual food estab­lish­ment. A sign on the door effec­tively apol­o­gizes for expected slow ser­vice. They go on to explain they are not fully staffed to prop­erly serve the patrons. Ouch!

Since 2012, the United States has been on an employ­ment hot streak. 2017 saw a 4.1 per­cent unem­ploy­ment rate, down con­sid­er­ably from a recent high of 10 per­cent in 2009.

Con­nect­ing with the right indi­vid­u­als for those unfilled posi­tions is a head scratcher. Job fairs, social media and incen­tivized recruit­ment are all part of the new hir­ing drill.

Read more: Now Hiring →

Vaca­tion­ers will take to the skies in record num­bers this sum­mer. Air travel can be very stress­ful with TSA check­points and man­ag­ing per­sonal affects.

Feel­ing good at the end of a flight may depend on how well and what we eat and drink inside the air­port ter­mi­nal.

Hydra­tion is essen­tial to hav­ing a good travel expe­ri­ence. Bring a portable water bot­tle to be filled once inside secu­rity clear­ance or pur­chase bot­tled water at ven­dor loca­tions. Drink up!

Avoid bev­er­ages known to upset the tummy. Too much cof­fee, alco­hol or orange juice will bother most peo­ple. Order more sooth­ing drinks like club soda or herbal teas.

Fruits like berries, pineap­ple, can­taloupe, cucum­bers and water­melon con­tain a high per­cent­age of water.

Read more: Air Fare →

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Seek­ing to infuse your culi­nary or bev­er­age cre­ations with the ulti­mate fresh fruit fla­vor? No need to peel, dice, purée, and sim­mer for those ideal results.
Per­fect Purée is the solution!

Per­fect Purée is the pre­mium purée prod­uct on the mar­ket. The suc­cu­lent, single-​note fla­vors of Per­fect Purée inspire every­thing you can think of: cock­tails, mari­nades, cakes, cook­ies, sor­bets and smooth­ies. At the back of the house or front of the house, chefs, cookes, baris­tas, bar­tenders, pas­try chefs, and brew mas­ters love this prod­uct line!

For a per­fect sum­mer, try out our favorite warm weather fla­vors: El Cora­zon, Pink Guava & Pas­sion Fruit.

Call us today to order your sam­ple kit. Can’t wait? Go online to http://​bit​.ly/​g​p​p​u​r​e​e.

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Sure, there are more ways than one to accom­plish any given task. Or cut a melon, pineap­ple or mango.

When ama­teur knife skills clash with more expert tech­niques, there is a lot to be learned.

Any­one can wield a knife blade. Exact­ing just the right cuts to extract every bit of fruit with­out waste can be tricky. Doing so safely is yet another feat.

Round-​shaped fruits are espe­cially unruly. Pic­ture a large can­taloupe or hon­ey­dew melon rolling around the coun­ter­top. There is a ten­dency to judo chop it dead cen­ter to stop that action.

Deft hands will exer­cise patience and exe­cute a plan.

One clever move is to first cut both ends of the melon off. This cre­ates a flat base on which to stand the melon on end.

Read more: Mak­ing the Cut →

Apples and oranges are great.

No one refutes their solid nutri­tional value or culi­nary ver­sa­til­ity.

By the time June rolls around, it’s time to mix things up in the fruit depart­ment. We crave the taste of sum­mer in all its stone fruit and berry glory.

Every trip to the gro­cer or farm­ers mar­ket is a delib­er­ate pur­suit for what’s new in the sea­son.

Early Cal­i­for­nia cher­ries have found their way to the stands. The sea­son looks to be a short and sweet one with a lim­ited crop this year. North­west cher­ries will quickly fol­low. No need to pout with Rainiers and red vari­eties like Chelan, Teiton and Bings rushed to mar­ket upon harvest.

Read more: Bare Fruited →

Amer­i­cans have a seri­ous love affair with snack­ing. Those of a cer­tain age might still define a snack as a quick mid­day grab for a Snick­ers bar or bag of potato chips.

Tra­di­tional daily eat­ing pat­terns are built around three “square and struc­tured” meals. Snacks were sup­ple­men­tal to those three squares.

This behav­ior is yield­ing to more mod­ern eat­ing styles char­ac­ter­ized by fre­quent snack­ing. These snack­ing events occur in a more unsys­tem­atic way and varies from per­son to per­son.

Snack­ing used to be about diver­sion, fun and indulging in food crav­ings. There is a shift toward health, well­ness, fresh and pre­mium snack foods.

Plea­sure is still a com­po­nent to snack­ing, but so are nour­ish­ment, opti­miza­tion and convenience.

Read more: Snack Happy →

The Blos­som Hill orchards are located in Pat­ter­son, Cal­i­for­nia. Some sug­gest this loca­tion to be the world’s best apricot-​growing region.

Lucich — San­tos Farms have been family-​owned for more than 90 years. For over 35 years, they’ve devel­oped exper­tise in grow­ing, pack­ing and ship­ping Cal­i­for­nia apri­cots and apri­ums under the Blos­som Hill Orchard name.

Four gen­er­a­tions over­see the daily oper­a­tions. Their over­ar­ch­ing goal is to pro­vide cus­tomers with the best eat­ing, sweet­est, juicy apri­cots.

Jim Lucich, sales rep­re­sen­ta­tive for Blos­som Hill, said the 2018 crop in Pat­ter­son is lighter than usual. Weather played a part with the crop set. Chill hours were lower than needed, and some cold and rain that came after the bloom had an effect on the crop.

The com­pany grows its apri­cots in a sustainable-​minded envi­ron­ment. Lucich and San­tos Farms and Blos­som Hill Packing’s objec­tive is to pro­duce pre­mium deli­cious fruit with food safety in mind.

Read more: Blos­som Hill →

There are ten cel­e­brated national hol­i­days in the United States, so named by con­gress. After those stayed hol­i­days, peti­tions get intro­duced to local, state and national offi­cials for com­mem­o­rat­ing other wor­thy days.

Fewer than 150 are granted in an aver­age year, across all cat­e­gories, by the pres­i­dent of the United States. Still oth­ers get invoked at a more local level procla­ma­tion.

Even so, that still gives us every­thing from National Pome­gran­ate Month and National Cherry or Pecan Pie Day to draw atten­tion to the pro­duce indus­try and ingre­di­ents wor­thy of a food hol­i­day.

How­ever man­u­fac­tured, some of the food related hol­i­days make per­fect sense. National Bar­be­cue Day and National Ham­burger Day coin­cide with the upcom­ing Memo­r­ial Day Hol­i­day week­end.

For most of the coun­try, Memo­r­ial Day week­end launches the sum­mer out­door cook­ing sea­son. We build mem­o­ries around shar­ing food and cre­at­ing food events in more casual environment.

Read more: Foodimentary →

Food safety risks may be reduced on the farm by fol­low­ing good agri­cul­tural prac­tices (GAPs).

GAPs help grow­ers under­stand the prac­tices and risks asso­ci­ated with their farm. They help iden­tify prac­ti­cal ways to reduce the risk of con­t­a­m­i­nat­ing pro­duce being grown, har­vested and packed.

There is no such thing as zero-​risk, but prac­tices and steps need to be in place on farms to min­i­mize any poten­tial risk of con­t­a­m­i­na­tion. Although the com­mon prin­ci­ples of GAPs don’t change from farm to farm, each GAP is unique, as every grower does things dif­fer­ently.

GAPs focus on assess­ing the risk in five key areas:
Water
Manure/​Compost and Soil Amend­ments
Land Use (Previous/​Adjacent) and Ani­mal Access (Domestic/​Wildlife)
Equip­ment, Tools & Build­ings
Employee Health & Hygiene

Read more: GAPs →

Earth Day is just behind us. Mother’s Day is just ahead. The two cel­e­bra­tions bring aware­ness to the influ­ences of moth­er­hood.

Mother Earth and Mother Nature cue their mes­sages from other like minded moth­ers. We are only on this lovely planet for a very short time. While we are here, we need to mind our man­ners and play by the rules.

Things a mother might say–

“Go out­side and play” was a mantra of all baby boomer moms. Get­ting on a bike or going for a hike meant ulti­mate free­dom.

Being out in nature has a way is fast-​paced life of ours can eas­ily strip out any nat­ural rhythm that we humans long to be a part of. The cycle of each sea­son speaks to our pri­mal nature. Go outside.

Read more: Lis­ten to Mother →

Its easy to ignore “The sky is falling” warn­ings when they are incon­clu­sive. The clas­sic folk tale of Henny Penny (Chicken Lit­tle) bares rec­ol­lec­tion when food safety is at stake.

The most recent indus­try mes­sages regard­ing romaine let­tuce alerts have been frus­trat­ing for every­one in the sup­ply chain.

In defense of all stake­hold­ers, no one wants to err on the side of per­sonal ill­ness or worse case sce­nario, death.

As com­pa­nies wait for more infor­ma­tion from fed­eral agen­cies on the E. coli O157:H7 out­break that has been ascribed to chopped romaine only and not a spe­cific sup­plier, fresh pro­duce indus­try asso­ci­a­tions are com­mu­ni­cat­ing in a uni­form voice about the sit­u­a­tion.

United Fresh Pro­duce Asso­ci­a­tion, Pro­duce Mar­ket­ing Asso­ci­a­tion, Cen­ters for Dis­ease Con­trol and Pre­ven­tion and the Leafy Greens Mar­ket­ing Agree­ment have worked in con­cert on com­mu­ni­ca­tions regard­ing this recent outbreak.

Read more: Henny Penny →

Cal­i­for­nia avo­ca­dos have arrived! They are gen­er­ally avail­able from April to Sep­tem­ber, but for the nearly 5,000 grow­ers in the state, the avo­cado sea­son is a year-​round endeavor.

Farm­ers walk their avo­cado groves every month to check on the trees, assess weather affects and grove con­di­tions. They must ensure avo­ca­dos are on the right track for pro­jected har­vests. Each stage in the growth cycle is crit­i­cal.

Avo­ca­dos, grown on trees, have a tree growth cycle with six stages: flow­er­ing, shoot growth, root growth, fruit set, fruit growth, and har­vest.
That’s a lot to watch and care for dur­ing each sea­son.

Cal­i­for­nia pro­duces about 90 per­cent of the nation’s avo­cado crop. Ninety-​five per­cent of Cal­i­for­nia avo­ca­dos are the Hass (rhymes with pass) vari­ety.

The Hass vari­ety accounts for about 80 per­cent of all avo­ca­dos eaten world­wide. By now, most of us under­stand that an avo­cado is actu­ally a fruit.

Read more: Taste California →

Nearly six years ago, meal kits com­pa­nies took the food scene by storm in the United States.

They looked to be the major dis­rup­tors in how peo­ple choose to pro­cure, pre­pare and eat food.

As Amer­i­can food cul­ture evolves, what we eat, when we eat and how we eat are all open to per­sonal inter­pre­ta­tion.

The crowded space of meal kit com­pa­nies is fac­ing fierce com­pe­ti­tion as meal sub­scribers are select­ing from vast options for con­ve­nience, value and vari­ety.

Gro­cery indus­try “brick and mor­tar” spend­ing rep­re­sents about $650 bil­lion, with a “B”, dol­lars in the U.S. The expe­ri­ence of daily pro­vi­sions can be frus­trat­ing at best with lots of energy devoted to meal plan­ning, gro­cery shop­ping and finally preparation.

Read more: Kit or Miss →

Once the door to Spring is cracked open, watch out. There seems to be no limit of vibrant swaths of color pop­ping up every­where.

It’s hard to miss the stun­ning fruit tree blos­som­ing in and around neigh­bor­hoods or road­side orchards.

A river walk presents clus­ters of wild neon pop­pies and ver­dant anise in early bloom. Breathe it all in…then exhale slowly.

Awaken the senses with pots of bold color after Easter pas­tels fade. Peren­nial bulb plants give us an excuse, as if one is needed, to dig in the gar­den beds.

Avoid get­ting dirt on the hands alto­gether with one quick trip to a gro­cery store these days. The bevy of new color bowls and pot­ted color bulbs and plants is staggering.

Read more: Inhale Spring →

The fleshy green spears of aspara­gus are all at once suc­cu­lent and ten­der. They have long been con­sid­ered a true sea­sonal del­i­cacy.

This highly prized veg­etable arrives with the com­ing of spring. When the shoots finally break through the soil and reach their peak har­vest length, we are ready to enjoy locally grown aspara­gus.

In Cal­i­for­nia, the first crops may be picked as early as Feb­ru­ary. The sea­son gen­er­ally is con­sid­ered to run from April through May. Like most things in agri­cul­ture, Mother Nature is in charge.

In the Mid­west and East, the sea­son may extend through June or July.

Under ideal grow­ing con­di­tions, an aspara­gus spear can shoot up to be eight to ten inches tall in a 24-​hour period. Each crown will send spears up for about six to seven weeks dur­ing the spring and early summer.

Read more: Spring Forth →

Kids of all ages have per­fected the art and tra­di­tion of egg dying for Easter.

From waxy pen­cils to small tablets of color, not much has changed in the dec­o­ra­tion process. Or has it?

The kitchen pantry is a stu­dio of nat­ural ingre­di­ents and inter­est­ing col­ors wait­ing to be used. Com­mon food items, and food waste in some cases, will trans­form an ordi­nary hard boiled egg into a beau­ti­ful show­piece.

Nat­ural dying ele­ments have long been used in fab­rics and paper. Porous eggshells invite color no mat­ter the source.

Red cab­bage and beets, brown, red or yel­low onion skins con­tribute to an array of egg color pos­si­bil­i­ties. So will cof­fee, tea, and dried spices.

Read more: A Few Good Eggs →

A 300 mile radius, or less, to define locally grown may not mat­ter much to those that are able to pick straight from a hoop house out back every­day.

That real­ity doesn’t exists for most fresh pro­duce cus­tomers.

For three sea­sons out of the year, regional grow­ers make it easy for us to scratch our local itch. That fourth sea­son is tougher to rely on for close to home grown.

Liv­ing in the mid-​west, or other cold belt states, poses real chal­lenges for sourc­ing fresh pro­duce from inside the USA dur­ing win­ter.

Cal­i­for­nia, Ari­zona and Florida man­age to eek out a fair amount of crop pro­duc­tion through the dead of win­ter. The desert regions (Yuma and Huron) do the heavy lift­ing for Ari­zona and Cal­i­for­nia let­tuce and wet veg­etable production.

Read more: Transitions →

Sig­na­ture dishes are those that proudly rep­re­sent the best efforts of a restau­rant, chef or cook. They reflect a sense of place, ingre­di­ents that work well together or reflect a shared food mem­ory.

We know that Aunt Alice’s potato salad will always be served at Sun­day sup­per or at the church pic­nic. No one can top banana cream pie from XYZ’s famous restau­rant.

The dishes we fondly remem­ber may have cer­tain emo­tional attach­ments. A young per­son going fish­ing with a favorite grand­dad looks for­ward to the hand­made pocket sand­wiches that get packed along for lunch.

Grandmother’s sig­na­ture falafel pita is wholly embraced partly because it tastes so ter­rific. The rest of the clamor is due to the cir­cum­stances in which it was enjoyed — who it was shared with, the expe­ri­ence in which it was eaten, the excite­ment of being out­doors, etc.

Sig­na­ture dishes are con­sis­tent. They are largely fail proof due to rep­e­ti­tion. By mak­ing some­thing over and over again, a per­son gets to labor over a recipe and then own it. Exper­i­ment­ing with that one spe­cial com­po­nent might put a sig­na­ture stamp on it.

Read more: Sig­na­ture Fails →

Last month, we were invited to host another PRO*ACT Recipe Chal­lenge with our employ­ees. This time, we were selected by Tay­lor Farms to try out their Cau­li­flower Pearls. Cau­li­flower has been trend­ing as a great carb sub­sti­tute and is com­monly used as a rice or potato replace­ment, so this con­ve­nient prod­uct was cre­ated to meet those demands.

On Mon­day, Sep­tem­ber 18, our res­i­dent GP “Chefs” made 12 deli­cious dishes with recipes they devel­oped just for this chal­lenge and recipes they already knew and loved from their favorite food blog­gers. The com­mon opin­ion among the Chefs is that the pre­cut Cau­li­flower Pearls saved them time by cut­ting out the prep­ping steps of wash­ing, cut­ting, and pro­cess­ing cau­li­flower. With how deli­cious all of these dishes are, that’s a huge win for any­one who wants to recre­ate them.

Read more: Cau­li­flower Pearls Recipe Challenge →

Gen­eral Pro­duce was selected by D’Arrigo Bros. Co., of CA to par­tic­i­pate in a PRO*ACT Recipe Chal­lenge. The prod­uct D’Arrigo chose to fea­ture was their Andy Boy Broc­coli Rabe. When we received the invi­ta­tion, we knew it was time to get cook­ing!

Our res­i­dent GP “chefs” boldly accepted the chal­lenge. With­out any expe­ri­ence cook­ing with the pro­vided Broc­coli Rabe, they faced off against one another to cre­ate orig­i­nal dishes. GP employ­ees tasted & voted on their favorites. D’Arrigo pro­vided prizes for the 3 chefs with the most pop­u­lar recipes. So who won? The cov­eted first place went to Linda Unden for her Broc­coli Rabe Soup. Sec­ond and third places respec­tively went to Mar­vin Wat­son for his Broc­coli Rabe Feta Ham Pie and Jen­nifer Ho for her Broc­coli Rabe Korean Pan­cake.

For both the par­tic­i­pants and the taste-​testers, it was a dif­fi­cult choice. We had 9 won­der­fully deli­cious recipes to enjoy. Check them out below & let us know which ones you would try.


Read more: Broc­coli Rabe Recipe Challenge →


David John dif­fer­en­ti­ates var­i­ous yams and sweet potatoes.



David John explains what Smit­ten Apples are, how they taste and how they com­pare to other apples.



David John talks about what to do with Cal­abaza and Red Kuri Squash. Try it!