indus­try events

  • Just a lit­tle less than 2 hours away in Pleasan­ton, the Expo It is a great oppor­tu­nity for us to see what’s new out there. It is easy for us to take our cus­tomers with us to con­nect with grow­ers, ship­pers, and retail­ers. The Expo exhibitors pro­vide updates on their lat­est crops and prod­ucts while we get to talk to them about how and why they do what they do.

    GP Team Mem­bers David John III, Jen­nifer Ho, Ray Hoell­warth, and Linda Unden attended the FPFC Nor­Cal Expo this year. They all enjoyed it and are look­ing for­ward to more FPFC events.

    Read more about the event:

  • In the realm of fresh food prod­ucts, either retail or food­ser­vice, prod­uct recalls are not par­tic­u­larly unusual.

    A recall is the action or method of remov­ing or cor­rect­ing prod­ucts that are in vio­la­tion of laws admin­is­tered by the Food and Drug Admin­is­tra­tion (FDA).

    A food recall occurs when there is rea­son to believe that a food may cause con­sumers to become ill. A food pro­ducer ini­ti­ates the recall to take foods off the mar­ket. In some sit­u­a­tions, food recalls are requested by gov­ern­ment agen­cies, such as the U.S. Food and Drug Admin­is­tra­tion (FDA) and the U.S. Depart­ment of Agri­cul­ture (USDA). Obvi­ously, prod­uct can be recalled for many rea­sons. This can include (but not be lim­ited to), the dis­cov­ery of organ­isms such as bac­te­ria like Sal­mo­nella or for­eign objects like bro­ken glass or metal. It can be due to a major aller­gen (dairy or nuts) not being dis­closed on a label.

    Most prod­uct recalls are char­ac­ter­ized as being “vol­un­tary”. This term is some­what ambigu­ous and may lead indi­vid­u­als to believe that a vol­un­tary recall is optional. That is def­i­nitely not true.

    A vol­un­tary recall is an indi­ca­tion that the man­u­fac­turer, grower or ship­per of the poten­tially harm­ful pro­duce has been in com­mu­ni­ca­tion and coop­er­a­tion with the fed­eral agency.

  • Giv­ing back is good. We believe in local farm­ing and we believe that sup­port­ing grow­ers in our com­mu­ni­ties is the best way to ensure a future for food.

    Cul­ti­vat­ing Change, the Greener Fields Together local farm grant pro­gram, aims to fund projects that will help local farm­ers do what they’re best at, farming.

    Grant amounts up to $30,000 will be funded on an annual basis to qual­i­fy­ing grow­ers through an online vot­ing plat­form and peer review panel.

    Cul­ti­vat­ing Change grants are open to all local farm­ers and aggre­ga­tors where pro­duce pro­duc­tion or aggre­ga­tion makes up at least fifty per­cent of their busi­ness. All appli­cants will be eli­gi­ble to par­tic­i­pate in the pop­u­lar vote por­tion of the con­test and only Greener Fields Together local farms will be eli­gi­ble to win by panel review.

    All appli­cants must use grant money for the pur­pose spec­i­fied on their appli­ca­tion, share project results, and if selected, agree to the usage of their name and like­ness in mar­ket­ing and pub­lic rela­tions collateral.

  • Cul­ti­vat­ing Change is a local farm grant pro­gram offered by Greener Fields Together.

    It aims to fund projects and pur­suits that will help local farm­ers do what they’re best at– farm­ing.

    Qual­i­fied grow­ers and aggre­ga­tors are able to win fund­ing based through an online vot­ing plat­form and peer review panel.

    As farm­ers applied for this cur­rent Jan­u­ary pro­gram, they were required to apply for a spe­cific fund­ing cat­e­gory to enhance an area of oper­a­tions. Demands for all farms and ranches requires a con­tin­u­ous state of improve­ment for sus­tain­abil­ity.

    Cer­ti­fi­ca­tions is one fund cat­e­gory that assists with organic, food safety, non-​GMO, fair trade, bio­dy­namic or other daunt­ing reg­u­la­tory require­ments. This is an avenue of com­pet­i­tive advan­tage for many growers.
  • Mar­ket­place trends are hot top­ics for dis­cus­sion when lean­ing in on the fresh pro­duce busi­ness.

    Sim­i­lar to other indus­tries where mov­ing prod­ucts from “Point A to Point B” is nec­es­sary, the fac­tor of trans­porta­tion is crit­i­cal to agri­cul­ture.

    So much is hap­pen­ing in the truck­ing indus­try right now, that it is a chal­lenge just to keep up with activ­ity. Con­vey­ing the impact of truck­ing to fresh mar­ket stake­hold­ers is another mat­ter alto­gether.

    Tech­nol­ogy advance­ments, new reg­u­la­tory require­ments, dri­ver short­ages, increases in freight rates and dete­ri­o­rat­ing high­ways are top of mind for all truck­ing com­pa­nies and dri­vers.

    Start­ing on Decem­ber 18th of this year, the com­pli­ance phase of the ELD (Elec­tronic Log­ging Device) man­date begins as dri­vers and fleets must start using Fed­eral Motor Car­rier Safety Admin­is­tra­tion (FMSCA) approved ELDs in their vehicles.
  • CON­GRAT­U­LA­TIONS RYAN BLANCAS!

    The United Fresh Retail Pro­duce Man­ager Awards Pro­gram pays spe­cial recog­ni­tion to pro­duce man­agers on the front lines in super­mar­kets work­ing every day to increase sales and con­sump­tion of fresh fruits and veg­eta­bles. Gen­eral Pro­duce is hon­ored to have nom­i­nated yet another win­ner, Ryan Blan­cas of Beale AFB Commissary.

    In June, Ryan, along with Gen­eral Pro­duce team mem­bers, will attend the United Fresh Pro­duce Inno­va­tion Con­fer­ence in Chicago. United Fresh will honor 25 of the industry’s top retail pro­duce man­agers for their com­mit­ment to fresh pro­duce, inno­v­a­tive mer­chan­dis­ing, com­mu­nity ser­vice and cus­tomer satisfaction.

    Left to right:
    Mar­lon Walker, Store Direc­tor, Beale AFB Com­mis­sary
    Alan Edi­ger, VP Busi­ness Devel­op­ment, Dole Fresh Veg­eta­bles
    Ryan Blan­cas, Pro­duce Man­ager, Beale AFB Com­mis­sary, 2016 Retail Pro­duce Man­ager Award Win­ner
    Jeff Ober­man, VP Trade Rela­tions, United Fresh Pro­duce Association