vegetables

  • “Jimmy Nardello” Sweet Pep­pers


    What are “Jimmy Nardello” sweet pep­pers and how are they used?


  • Arugula


    Selec­tion, usage and stor­age of arugula.
  • Aspara­gus Tips

    Once a har­bin­ger of spring, aspara­gus is now avail­able nearly year round with imported prod­uct from Peru and Mex­ico.

    Even so, when fields in Cal­i­for­nia begin to sprout up ten­der tips, by early April, it’s indica­tive of a sea­sonal shift in local eat­ing habits.

    An ele­gant veg­etable with long, ten­der shoots that are gen­er­ally cat­e­go­rized as white, pur­ple and green vari­eties, all belong­ing to a plant in the lily fam­ily.

    The shoots of the green and white vari­eties are usu­ally hand-​harvested when the stalks reach a height of around eight inches and are one quar­ter to half inch thick. The com­pact, tightly packed leaves (resem­bling scales) at the top of the stalk are prized for their soft, to crunchy tex­ture and mild, provoca­tive fla­vor.

    Green aspara­gus is tra­di­tion­ally the most com­mon vari­ety grown in the United States. Pur­ple or white aspara­gus is usu­ally avail­able on a lim­ited basis in spe­cialty and farm­ers markets.
  • Baby Food

    Eas­ily rec­og­nized, yams and sweet pota­toes are some of those ugly fall and early win­ter root veg­eta­bles that are found on the side of the plate this time of year.

    Roasted, stuffed and on occa­sion, marsh­mal­low topped, the grow­ing pop­u­lar­ity of sweet pota­toes and yams has pushed their demand to become a year-​round thing.

    Baby yams and sweet pota­toes, avail­able sea­son­ally from August through Decem­ber, make it eas­ier to enjoy a single-​serve sweet gem.

    Com­pared to their larger coun­ter­parts, the smaller baby ver­sions allow for a petite, ten­der vari­ety to daz­zle the dish with color and fla­vor. With an edi­ble skin, the baby size have a sig­nif­i­cantly faster cook­ing time.

    Well known named vari­eties, sim­i­lar to their larger and jumbo cousins include Gar­net, Jewel, Japan­ese and Sweet Potatoes.
  • Basil


    Dif­fer­en­ti­at­ing basil in appear­ance, fla­vor and usage.

  • Black Radish


    David John dis­cusses avail­abil­ity, prepa­ra­tion, usage, fla­vor and his favorite way to eat Black Radishes.
  • Cal­abaza & Red Kuri Squash


    David John talks about what to do with Cal­abaza and Red Kuri Squash. Try it!


  • Cauli Hacks

    Let’ s be hon­est. In the wide open uni­verse of fresh veg­eta­bles, there are many picks that beat out cau­li­flower in pop­u­lar­ity.

    In chef cir­cles, we hear of inno­v­a­tive ways to har­ness the full fla­vor of this under rep­re­sented power source.

    Roast­ing leads the way in the method cat­e­gory. An earthy, nutty fla­vor devel­ops by sim­ply oven roast­ing with noth­ing more than a sprin­kle of salt and a driz­zle of cook­ing oil.

    The real genius of hacks comes from allow­ing the cau­li­flower to play a sup­port­ing role. Try cast­ing this white, crunchy char­ac­ter in numer­ous dishes that embrace bolder per­son­al­ity traits.

    Korean bar­be­cue bowls, buf­falo cau­li­flower steaks, chimichurri cauli, bat­tered and fried and cau­li­flower alfredo liven up the dol­drums of this pedes­trian cruciferous.
  • Cock­tail Avo­ca­dos


    Cock­tail Avo­ca­dos: What they are, when and how to use them.
  • Cook­ing Greens


    About the Pro­duce Beat: David John hosts this weekly pro­gram regard­ing every­thing you ever wanted to know about fresh fruits and veg­eta­bles: selec­tion, stor­age, prepa­ra­tion, vari­eties, sea­sonal avail­abil­ity, trivia, and his per­sonal secrets about how to enjoy pro­duce.
  • Cucamel­ons


    What are Cucamel­ons and how are they used?
  • Egg­plants


    Selec­tion tips, dif­fer­ences and fla­vor pro­files of var­i­ous eggplants.

  • Fen­nel


    How to pick, store, and 3 ways to use fennel.


  • Fin­ger­ling Pota­toes


    Happy Potato Lover’s Month! Learn all about fin­ger­ling pota­toes.
  • Fork “Over” Knife

    A plant-​based diet can boost opti­mum health, decreas­ing the risk of heart dis­ease, Type 2 dia­betes, and cer­tain can­cers.

    The main advan­tages with a plant-​based diet seem to be related more to the foods con­sumed (eat­ing plenty of veg­eta­bles, fruits, whole grains, beans and nuts) rather than those foods avoided (pri­mar­ily meats).

    Stay­ing at a healthy weight is eas­ier on a plant-​based diet and menu. A “less meat, more plants” style of eat­ing can improve qual­ity of life.

    Asso­ci­ated ben­e­fits include the reduc­tion of inflam­ma­tion and dis­eases attrib­uted to inflam­ma­tion. Lower cho­les­terol and blood pres­sure lev­els are oth­ers plus ups seen with plant-​based food choices.

    There are many dif­fer­ent types of plant-​based diets. The three most com­mon ones are: Vegan: No ani­mal prod­ucts such as meat, eggs, or dairy prod­ucts. Lacto-​vegetarian: No meat or eggs, but dairy prod­ucts are accept­able. Lacto-​Ovo-​vegetarian: No meat is con­sumed, but dairy prod­ucts and eggs are allowed.
  • Fresh Corn; Baby Corn; Sun­shine Rasp­ber­ries


    How to select corn; baby corn; intro­duc­ing new Sun­shine Raspberries.

  • Fresh Figs; Fresh Gar­banzo Beans


    David John dis­cusses sea­sonal items; mar­ket con­di­tion of figs; how to pre­pare fresh gar­banzo beans for a sum­mer treat.


  • Fresh Turmeric


    Turmeric: what it is, health ben­e­fits, prepa­ra­tion, usage.
  • Globe Arti­chokes


    How to select, pre­pare, cook and store arti­chokes.
  • Good Stuff

    Nearly any­thing stuffed will con­vince us that there is a cel­e­bra­tion in the mak­ing.

    That could mean an easy week­night din­ner party if the vehi­cle used for stuff­ing is a por­to­bello mush­room.

    In North­ern Italy, this over­sized mush­room is called “cap­pel­lone” which means “big hat”. It makes sense as the shape resem­bles a large cap or top­per (just right for stuff­ing).

    To be clear, once a cri­m­ini mush­room reaches between four to six inches in diam­e­ter, it is offi­cially called a por­to­bello or porta­bella. Yes, they are one in the same vari­ety, with a dif­fer­ent matu­rity level dic­tat­ing its name.

    A porta­bello is rec­og­nized by it’s open, flat sur­face (cap). Because it’s left to grow larger, the gills are fully exposed. This means that some of the mushroom’s mois­ture has evap­o­rated. The reduced mois­ture con­cen­trates and enriches the fla­vor and cre­ates a dense, meaty texture.