pro­duce consumption

  • “Hydro”-Therapy

    Drink­ing water dur­ing the win­ter sea­son is cru­cial. One hardly feels thirsty dur­ing win­ter months, but stay­ing ahead of cold sea­son requires some good old fash­ioned “hydro-​therapy”.

    Often neglected dur­ing the win­ter sea­son, keep­ing one­self hydrated is of utmost impor­tance. In light of stay­ing healthy and pro­mot­ing opti­mal well­ness, explore the ben­e­fits of warm or hot water.

    The biggest ben­e­fit may be from the mere tem­per­a­ture of the water and not even any added fla­vors (lemons, gin­ger, mint, etc.). Drink­ing any water, espe­cially warm water, the first thing in the morn­ing can help flush the diges­tive sys­tem and rehy­drate the body.
  • “Jimmy Nardello” Sweet Pep­pers


    What are “Jimmy Nardello” sweet pep­pers and how are they used?


  • Apple Hill Apples


    David John explains the his­tory and cur­rent state of Apple Hill apples.


  • Arugula


    Selec­tion, usage and stor­age of arugula.
  • Basil


    Dif­fer­en­ti­at­ing basil in appear­ance, fla­vor and usage.

  • Best Fronds

    Fen­nel is one of those “old soul” obscure veg­eta­bles that peo­ple either love, hate or know zilch about.


    Assertive in fla­vor, this aro­matic bulb-​like bot­tom is topped with wil­lowy fronds that have a del­i­cate, sweet anise fla­vor. These ten­der lacy tops are best used like fresh herbs.


    Fen­nel sprigs added to fall and win­ter sal­ads and starter plates add a bit of bright­ness in place of dill, tar­ragon or thyme. The dis­tinc­tive bite is memorable.

    The sig­na­ture mild licorice taste of raw fen­nel bulb or stalk is tamed when roasted, braised, sautéed or baked. The bulb and stalk are then softened.
  • Black Radish


    David John dis­cusses avail­abil­ity, prepa­ra­tion, usage, fla­vor and his favorite way to eat Black Radishes.
  • Blood Oranges


    Not much grows in the win­ter besides pota­toes and cit­rus fruits. From the won­der­ful king­dom of juicy, tart, and sweet cit­rus, Blood Oranges rule them all. This week, David John talks about these rich-​colored flesh fruits.
  • Break­ing Down Bar­ri­ers for Local Food

    By Kath­leen Weaver

    Most con­sumers believe pro­duce comes shrouded in plas­tic; per­fectly selected apples pre­sented in a pris­tine pack­age ready to enjoy. And while any­one eat­ing fruits and veg­eta­bles excites me for all the obvi­ous rea­sons; health and com­merce related, there is one sig­nif­i­cant dif­fer­ence between the eater of today and that of the past. Eighty years ago most folks knew how an apple was grown, which is no longer the case.

    Eighty years ago a sub­stan­tial chunk of the work­force was employed in agri­cul­ture; 22% of work­ers rep­re­sent­ing roughly 27 of 123 mil­lion peo­ple who called the US home at the time. They farmed on small farms in all regions of the US pro­duc­ing mostly for their own sub­sis­tence. How­ever, trends began to shift with elec­tri­fi­ca­tion, mech­a­niza­tion, and infra­struc­ture and trans­port improve­ments, allow­ing peo­ple to seek off-​farm work. This is where we see the most sub­stan­tial change in our food sys­tem that until recently remained unchallenged.

  • Cac­tus Pears


    David John III explains how to pick, clean, eat and use the cac­tus pear.


  • Cal­abaza & Red Kuri Squash


    David John talks about what to do with Cal­abaza and Red Kuri Squash. Try it!


  • Cal­i­for­nia Apples


    Dif­fer­en­ti­at­ing apples in appear­ance and flavor.

  • Cal­i­for­nia Apri­cots


    David John shares how to choose and store apri­cots for best flavor.


  • Cal­i­for­nia Blue­ber­ries


    David John offers ideas for enjoy­ing this year’s Cal­i­for­nia blue­berry crop.


  • Cen­tral Val­ley Grapes


    What’s new in Cal­i­for­nia grapes.

  • Chilean Navels


    Chilean Navels are in sea­son and bet­ter than ever!


  • Chill Fac­tor

    One great aspect of sum­mer din­ing is the obvi­ous, more relaxed approach to meals. “No fuss” and “effort­less” are hall­marks of any indeli­ble al fresco lunch or sup­per in July.

    Whether a crunchy radish or car­rot is plucked from our own gar­den, pur­chased from a sea­sonal farm­ers mar­ket or for­aged from the pro­duce aisle of a local gro­cer, they get sliced the same.

    In sum­mer, straight­for­ward ingre­di­ents and sim­ple serv­ings lead to plates that are an invi­ta­tion to relax and chill out.

    Noth­ing for­mal is required. Take note of com­pat­i­ble part­ners or oppo­site attrac­tions. Bright col­ors, var­ied tex­tures, a dip or spread here, a bowl of olives or Mar­cona almonds there and “voilà”.

    The point of eat­ing, after all, is to nour­ish, restore and replen­ish. What we eat mat­ters more than how it is served. The plate itself is only a visual invite. If it looks good, we want to dive in.
  • Cock­tail Avo­ca­dos


    Cock­tail Avo­ca­dos: What they are, when and how to use them.
  • Cook­ing Greens


    About the Pro­duce Beat: David John hosts this weekly pro­gram regard­ing every­thing you ever wanted to know about fresh fruits and veg­eta­bles: selec­tion, stor­age, prepa­ra­tion, vari­eties, sea­sonal avail­abil­ity, trivia, and his per­sonal secrets about how to enjoy pro­duce.
  • Cucamel­ons


    What are Cucamel­ons and how are they used?