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Wel­come!

Gen­eral Pro­duce is a third gen­er­a­tion, locally owned and oper­ated fresh pro­duce com­pany located in North­ern Cal­i­for­nia. We dis­trib­ute and export fresh fruits and veg­eta­bles — local, organic, sus­tain­able, regional and glob­ally sourced. Get to Know Us!


Memo­r­ial Day and week­end are focused on cel­e­bra­tion and remem­brance for those who’ve made the ulti­mate sac­ri­fice. We honor those who’ve died while serv­ing this great nation.

Invari­ably, the week­end also ends up being the unof­fi­cial start of sum­mer. Vaca­tion travel, pic­nics, camp­ing, bar­be­cues and patio par­ties bring fam­i­lies and friends together.

Lucky for us all then that with warm weather trend­ing, sum­mer berries are com­ing into peak play. Cal­i­for­nia grow­ing regions are now har­vest­ing sen­sa­tional blue­ber­ries, straw­ber­ries, rasp­ber­ries, boy­sen­ber­ries and black­ber­ries.

Multi-​dimensional, berries add that burst of color and fla­vor zing, just where expected. Plan­ning for break­fast, smooth­ies, sal­ads or sum­mer desserts? Berries are a knock­out for pre­sen­ta­tion and get an A+ for taste.

Straw­ber­ries always seem to top the list for favorite fruits. Blue­ber­ries are inch­ing up with kids and those adults who like to power up with super foods.

The antiox­i­dants in berries just seem to be an added bonus. We eat them because we love them. The fact that they are a health­ier alter­na­tive to other pos­si­ble warm weather treats makes them all the more desirable.

Read more: Red, White & Blue →

Dam­asco is the Por­tuguese name for apri­cot. The Wesley/​Patterson area of Cal­i­for­nia is con­sid­ered one of the prime apri­cot grow­ing regions in the entire coun­try.

Once named the “Apri­cot Capi­tol of the World”, the Mediter­ranean cli­mate and well-​drained soils make this loca­tion an apri­cot par­adise.

This arid land­scape is also still home to many Por­tuguese farm­ers and fam­i­lies who set­tled there to make farm­ing a way of life.

Every sum­mer, the Pat­ter­son Apri­cot Fiesta cel­e­brates the stone fruit that has a rich Cal­i­for­nia his­tory. This year, the fes­ti­val will run June 2nd4th.

Apri­cots debuted in Cal­i­for­nia in the orchards and gar­dens of the Span­ish mis­sions. Cal­i­for­nia farm­ers grow more than 95 per­cent of the nation’s apri­cots. In a typ­i­cal weather year, har­vest begins in Kern County and moves north­ward through the San Joaquin Val­ley to the Westley/​Patterson area.

Read more: “Damascos“ →

Once a har­bin­ger of spring, aspara­gus is now avail­able nearly year round with imported prod­uct from Peru and Mex­ico.

Even so, when fields in Cal­i­for­nia begin to sprout up ten­der tips, by early April, it’s indica­tive of a sea­sonal shift in local eat­ing habits.

An ele­gant veg­etable with long, ten­der shoots that are gen­er­ally cat­e­go­rized as white, pur­ple and green vari­eties, all belong­ing to a plant in the lily fam­ily.

The shoots of the green and white vari­eties are usu­ally hand-​harvested when the stalks reach a height of around eight inches and are one quar­ter to half inch thick. The com­pact, tightly packed leaves (resem­bling scales) at the top of the stalk are prized for their soft, to crunchy tex­ture and mild, provoca­tive fla­vor.

Green aspara­gus is tra­di­tion­ally the most com­mon vari­ety grown in the United States. Pur­ple or white aspara­gus is usu­ally avail­able on a lim­ited basis in spe­cialty and farm­ers markets.

Read more: Aspara­gus Tips →

Pub­lic health offi­cials esti­mate that nearly 48 mil­lion peo­ple are sick­ened each year by food that has been con­t­a­m­i­nated with harm­ful bac­te­ria.

Most peo­ple are aware that ani­mal prod­ucts must be han­dled care­fully to pre­vent ill­ness. Many need a reminder that fresh pro­duce can also be the cul­prit in out­breaks of food­borne ill­ness.

Out­breaks can be large, wide­spread or local­ized. In recent years, let­tuce, spinach, green onions and toma­toes have been the source of food ill­nesses.

As our fresh pro­duce con­sump­tion trends up in sum­mer months. Now is a good time for a refresh on prac­tices and pro­to­cols on safe food han­dling.

Fresh pro­duce can become con­t­a­m­i­nated in many ways. Dur­ing the grow­ing phase, fruits and veg­gies may be con­t­a­m­i­nated by ani­mals, harm­ful sub­stances in the soil or water, and by poor hygiene among work­ers. After pro­duce is har­vested, it passes through many hands, increas­ing con­t­a­m­i­na­tion risks.

Read more: All Washed Up! →

Essen­tial to any good cook’s essen­tial ingre­di­ent list is the globe onion. A well stocked pantry will have on hand at the very least, one or two vari­eties.

The two main types of globe onions are pun­gent and mild. Both are clas­si­fied into either long-​day or short day bulbs, the length of day­light time required for the actual bulb to form.

Mild vari­ety onions are typ­i­cally large and juicy with thick rings and thin, papery skins that peel eas­ily. They can be cooked, but are the likely can­di­dates to be used raw on sand­wiches, in sal­ads and the like. These are the ones that make great onion rings.

Unfor­tu­nately, mild onions are very poor “keep­ers”. Even in ideal stor­age con­di­tions, they will only main­tain their eat­ing qual­ity for a cou­ple months. Ide­ally, a wind­fall of mild onions can be pre­served in pick­les, sal­sas and chutneys.

Read more: The “Cure“ →

It won’t come as a sur­prise that color has a pro­found effect on mood. With Spring in gear, plan to lift more than a mood by sur­round­ing work and home spaces with bright flow­ers, flow­er­ing plants and pot­ted herbs.

Plac­ing pots of color in work envi­ron­ments and around the house can seri­ously boost pro­duc­tiv­ity and con­tribute to our men­tal clar­ity through­out the day.

While there are many high-​tech ways to improve air qual­ity, one refresh­ingly easy method is to bring liv­ing plants into our liv­ing spaces. Bet­ter indoor air qual­ity helps to keep the immune sys­tem strong. Breath­ing fresher air is invig­o­rat­ing and bright­ens up the day.

Read more: Mood Swings →

Pre­sented with any one of many beau­ti­fully grown fresh fruit or veg­etable items, a few quick ques­tions spring to mind.

How does it taste? What can we make? How do we treat it? How much should we buy?

It’s amaz­ing how the sight of a fra­grantly ripe melon or aro­matic peach will be per­ceived among any group of indi­vid­u­als. So many choices, all dif­fer­ent, and none of them wrong.

Slice for the plate or a salad, blend for smoothie, sor­bet or ices, grill for a sum­mer side or bake into a break­fast or dessert treat. Pref­er­ences depend on the mind and heart of the cook.

Inspi­ra­tion is gen­er­ated from cook­books, fam­ily tra­di­tions, cul­ture, food mag­a­zine arti­cles, and now, the abun­dance of irre­sistible social media posts.

Read more: Perspective →

Just when that reser­voir of sup­per ideas runs dry, it’s time to cir­cle back to the cue line on past great per­for­mances.

Quiche is one of those for­got­ten dishes that deserve a chance to rejoin the menu lineup.

Spring ingre­di­ents seem to lean in to the con­cept of quiche done right. A lus­cious pie filled with savory, cooked to per­fect, ingre­di­ents.

Aspara­gus, peas, spinach, mush­rooms, alli­ums, scal­lions and fresh herbs make for a bright start to a sen­sa­tional din­ner. Let’s face it, brunch or lunch are fair ter­ri­tory for a good tast­ing quiche, too.

Any excuse for home­made pie crust gets star sta­tus. The shell should be par-​baked first to get a solid, firm tex­ture going prior to fill­ing with dairy and sup­port­ing cast members.

Read more: Back to “Q“ →

Brus­sels sprouts and cau­li­flower have enjoyed the recent lime­light with chefs and home cooks.

The hum­ble car­rot is wor­thy of some kitchen love and atten­tion.

Car­rots are at their sweet­est in spring, when their bright col­ors and del­i­cate fla­vors shine.

They are ten­der enough to enjoy raw in sal­ads and yet hearty enough for roast­ing, pick­ling, mash­ing and purees. Soups and stews are made bet­ter when car­rots take the stage.

Juic­ing car­rots, alone or with other fruits and veg­eta­bles, is a game chang­ing spring rit­ual for those look­ing for a sea­sonal cleanse or detox. Their inher­ent, earthy sweet­ness bal­ances other flavors.

Read more: Team Carrot →

Prod­ucts

Our inven­tory is exten­sive and reflects the fresh­est and cur­rent mar­ket availability.

Con­ven­tional Fruits and Vegetables
Organic Fruits and Vegetables
Value-​added/​Fresh-​cut Products
Spe­cialty, Exotic, Trop­i­cal, and Eth­nic Produce
Fresh-​cut and Pot­ted Floral
Gro­cery Products
Fresh Juices and Frozen Food Items
Eggs, Cheese and Other Dairy Products
Herbs, Snack Foods, Nuts and Supplies

Exotic

vegetables

Fresh Veg­eta­bles

fruits

Fresh Fruits

Organics

Value Added

Tropical

Ethnic

Herbs

Fresh-​cut and Pot­ted Floral

Eggs, Cheese & Other Dairy

Juices

zucchini flowers

Specialty

Gro­cery Items and More

PRO*ACT

PRO*ACT con­tacts with the nation’s lead­ing grow­ers and ship­pers to offer you sig­nif­i­cant cost ben­e­fits and an easy solu­tion to secure the fresh­est produce.

DIS­COVER YOUR ADVANTAGE

Greener Fields Together